The Effects of Stress – How Adrenaline Adds Years to Your Face

A threat is a threat as far as your subconscious mind is concerned.  Whether real or imagined your brain reacts in the same way to any ‘threat’ – by pumping stress hormones into your bloodstream.  It’s these stress hormones that trigger immediate changes in your body’s biochemical state.  You have experienced it – we all have – raised blood pressure, palpitations and mental reactions such as anger, fear, worry or aggression.  In short, stress upsets your normal bodily balance.

Of course nature doesn’t do this to you lightly. Adrenaline is released for a reason – to save your life. Raised adrenaline levels prepare your body to run away from trouble or to confront it
with a superhuman effort in dangerous situations. Adrenaline is the reason you could survive a life-threatening situation. Adrenaline is also at least partly responsible for great
sporting achievements or a supreme test of endurance.

Unfortunately, when the stress response occurs in less threatening situations, the adrenaline released simply causes burn out and disruption to your body. Think about a situation which
caused you acute anxiety recently – a job interview; standing up in public to say a few words; confronting a personal difficulty with a friend or colleague; an argument at home. You
probably felt your heart thumping, your brain racing, your blood pressure increase and every sense in your body on high alert. When the situation was over no doubt you felt exhausted –
physically and mentally drained. That is the toll the stress response takes on your body. Fine if it saved your life – but extremely harmful otherwise.

Most times the extra chemicals in your bloodstream from the stress response don’t get used – for instance in fleeing for your life or fighting off attackers. Many times the imaginary or real
threat persists over a long period. In this way your immune system is affected and you can become more prone to mental and physical illnesses. It can happen to anybody from a high
profile business executive to a student, or a home-maker. We are all are burning out our energies to defend ourselves from real or perceived causes of stress.

You probably won’t be at all surprised to learn that stress accelerates the aging process. The stress response upsets your body’s natural balance which causes damage to hormone secretion,
cell repair and collagen production. So next time you look at someone and conclude they must have had a hard or a sad life – based on what you see on their face – the chances are
you’re right. Worry, anxiety and stress really do etch themselves on our faces. The stress response is nature’s way of getting us out of trouble and there’s no doubt it helps us to come
through disaster and overcome adversity. But it can also harm you physically and mentally and what’s worse it can age you before your time.

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Rock Steady Boxing of Brownsburg is, a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization, that gives people with Parkinson’s disease hope by improving their quality of life through a non-contact boxing based fitness curriculum. Our mission is to empower people with Parkinson’s disease to fight back.Rock Steady Boxing is the first gym in the country dedicated to the fight against Parkinson’s. In our gym, exercises are largely adapted from boxing drills. Boxers condition for optimal agility, speed, muscular endurance, accuracy, hand-eye coordination, footwork and overall strength to defend against and overcome opponents. At RSB, Parkinson’s disease is the opponent. Exercises vary in purpose and form and are modified based upon the individual’s abilities and current level of Parkinson’s.

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